Wounded Being Carried Into Medical Centre....!

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Channel Title : AP Archive

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Published Date : 2015-07-21T13:30:28.000Z

SHOTLIST 1. Exterior of entrance to Tbilisi Gudushauri Medical Centre 2. Ambulance driving up to medical centre 3. Cutaway of women looking down from window 4. People helping injured man out of car 5. Close of injured man with bandaged arm 6. Injured elderly man being helped out of car 7. Injured elderly man being helped on to hospital gurney 8. Various of grieving relatives outside medical centre, women crying 9. Various of people looking though list of names posted outside medical centre 10. Various of medics and security outside medical centre STORYLINE A number of people wounded in an early morning Russian military offensive on the Georgian town of Gori were taken to the Gudushauri Medical Centre in Tbilisi for treatment on Tuesday. AP Television footage showed several wounded being brought to the medical centre, including an elderly man, as grieving relatives gathered outside. Earlier in the day, Georgia's Prime Minister, Lado Gurgenidze, said in a nationally televised statement that Russian airstrikes had hit the eastern town of Gori and surrounding areas. Russian jets targeted administrative buildings and a street market in the centre of Gori on Tuesday, Georgia's security chief confirmed. He did not offer any immediate information about casualties. Tuesday's offensive came just hours before Russian President Dmitry Medvedev ordered a halt to military action in Georgia, after five days of air and land attacks that took Russian forces halfway across the small Western-allied nation. The Russian-Georgian conflict exploded on Friday after a Georgian offensive to regain control of separatist South Ossetia. Georgia borders the Black Sea between Turkey and Russia and was ruled by Moscow for most of the two centuries preceding the 1991 break-up of the Soviet Union. Both South Ossetia and Abkhazia have run their own affairs without international recognition since fighting to split from Georgia in the early 1990s. Both separatist provinces have close ties with Moscow. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/2b1ba45d46fd1c105dc4e539ea7a676a Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
    

Channel Title : AP Archive

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Published Date : 2015-07-21T13:46:24.000Z

(9 Jan 2009) SHOTLIST Jebaliya, northern Gaza 1. Various of smoke rising over buildings Between Jebaliya and Beit Lahiya in northern Gaza 2. Ambulance rushing to Kamal Adwan hospital 3. Body on stretcher being rushed inside 4. Body covered by blanket being taken out of ambulance 5. Another ambulance rushing to hospital, medics opening ambulance door 6. Injured child being wheeled into hospital 7. Man carrying injured child to emergency room inside hospital 8. Various of injured people arriving at the hospital 9. Injured child receiving medical treatment 10. Various of injured people, including children, receiving medical attention 11. Wide of hospital ward 12. Wide exterior of Kamal Adwan hospital Gaza City, Gaza Strip 13. Wide of Sinan Filfil family running down street, fleeing in panic as bomb alert sounds 14. Injured people entering Shifa hospital 15. Sinan Filfil family inside Shifa hospital STORYLINE: Two separate Israeli airstrikes on the northern Gaza Strip, left several Palestinians wounded, one critically, according to Palestinian medical sources and eye witnesses. The wounded were evacuated to the Kamal Adwan hospital around Jebaliya, in northern Gaza. Among the wounded was a young Palestinian boy. In Gaza City, there were scenes of panic as an Israeli bomb alert went off, warning of an imminent attack. The Sinan Filfil family rushed down the street, desperately trying to flee upon receiving a warning that the Israeli army was targeting their home. The family immediately rushed out of their home to seek shelter as the smoke of the bomb alert filled the air around their home. Running out onto the street with nothing but the clothes they were wearing, the family luckily found shelter at Shifa hospital, Gaza's main hospital. Hospitals and medical centres have been completely overwhelmed by the increasing number of civilian casualties, and are fast running out of vital medical supplies and equipment. An intense bombardment of missiles from Israeli jets and helicopters continued to pound Gaza early on Friday, pushing the death toll to about 760 in the near two-week conflict launched by Israel on Gaza. Overnight Israeli warplanes hit more than 30 targets before dawn, just hours after a United Nations Security Council overwhelmingly approved a resolution urging an immediate and durable cease-fire. The conflict has left hundreds of thousands of Palestinians in Gaza increasingly desperate for food, water, fuel and medical assistance, and the situation was expected to worsen as humanitarian efforts fall victim to the fighting. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/9a4aece9971f98539e1527cde4547b84 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
    

Channel Title : CriticalPast

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Published Date : 2014-03-15T04:47:19.000Z

CriticalPast is an archive of historic footage. The vintage footage in this video has been uploaded for research purposes, and is presented in unedited form. Some viewers may find some scenes or audio in this archival material to be unsettling or distressing. CriticalPast makes this media available for researchers and documentarians, and does not endorse or condone any behavior or message, implied or explicit, that is seen or heard in this video. "Link to order this clip: http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65675032204_American-soldiers_Korean-war_soldiers-are-evacuated-in-the-aircraft_taken-to-Japan-for-treatment Historic Stock Footage Archival and Vintage Video Clips in HD. U.S. Army Medical Service in Korea. Evacuation of wounded to Japan for treatment during the Korean War Medical aid being provided to U.S. soldiers during the Korean War. Helicopters with special containers on their sides to be used for evacuation. An injured soldier being carried in a container on the side of the helicopter. The helicopter takes off. An injured soldier being brought to a medical station aboard a light liaison airplane. Men carry soldier on stretcher into an evacuation airplane. Cover over ramp into aircraft reads'374th troop carrier wing, Hospital Evacuation'. The aircraft will evacuate the wounded to Japan. In Japan, Japanese civilians are seen carrying wounded U.S. soldiers from a C-47 aircraft ,on a stretcher into an ambulance. View of ambulance interior,shows tiers of litters. Ambulance arrives at Tokyo Army Hospital. View of the hospital building. The wounded soldiers being carried into the hospital for treatment. Location: Korea. Date: 1953. Visit us at www.CriticalPast.com: 57,000+ broadcast-quality historic clips for immediate download. Fully digitized and searchable, the CriticalPast collection is one of the largest archival footage collections in the world. All clips are licensed royalty-free, worldwide, in perpetuity. CriticalPast offers immediate downloads of full-resolution HD and SD masters and full-resolution time-coded screeners, 24 hours a day, to serve the needs of broadcast news, TV, film, and publishing professionals worldwide. Still photo images extracted from the vintage footage are also available for immediate download. CriticalPast is your source for imagery of worldwide events, people, and B-roll spanning the 20th century."
    

Channel Title : AP Archive

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Published Date : 2015-07-28T10:22:27.000Z

SHOTLIST Ramstein Air Base 1. US Air Force plane taxiing on tarmac 2. CBS camera crew filming 3. Injured US journalist Kimberly Dozier being carried out of plane on stretcher and onto ambulance 4. Personnel closing doors of ambulance 5. Ambulance drives off, wide of scene Landstuhl Regional Medical Centre 6. Colonel W. Bryan Gamble, Commander of Landstuhl Regional Medical Centre walking into press conference 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Colonel W. Bryan Gamble, Commander of Landstuhl Regional Medical Centre: "Morning everyone, this morning at about 10am local time (0800gmt), Ms Dozier and another critically injured soldier from same IED (improvised explosive device) blast were transported from Balad (roughly 100 kilometres from Baghdad) and arrived at Landstuhl Regional Medical Centre. They were taken to our intensive care unit, where our team of critical care specialists and trauma surgeons, went over them from head to toe. To reassess their condition and their trip by the sea cat team. Ms Dozier came, with all vital signs stable. She is critically wounded as you know from the IED blast yesterday but right now she is doing as well as can be expected." ++question has poor audio quality++ Off camera reporter Q:) "Is she expected to undergo any surgery here? SOUNDBITE: (English) Colonel W. Bryan Gamble, Commander of Landstuhl Regional Medical Centre: "Typically most wounded individuals will undergo another surgery or two every 24 - 48 hrs. This is what we call washout procedure, where we re examine their wounds, if any tissue needs to be cleaned we will clean it, and reassess the vitality of the tissue, but this is pretty typical." STORYLINE Injured CBS correspondent Kimberly Dozier arrived early on Tuesday at Ramstein Air Base in Germany on a US military flight from Iraq. She was transferred by ambulance to Landstuhl Regional Medical centre, where she will be treated for injuries suffered in a roadside bombing in Baghdad on Monday, officials at the US airbase said. Colonel W Bryan Gamble, Commander of Landstuhl Regional Medical Centre, said during a news briefing on Tuesday, Ms Dozier and another solider critically injured in the same blast were checked over from "head to toe" by "trauma surgeons critical care specialists," on arrival. Her vital signs were stable, but Gamble pointed to the seriousness of Dozier's injuries. "Ms Dozier came, with all vital signs stable. She is critically wounded as you know from the IED blast yesterday but right now she is doing as well as can be expected," he said. Dozier will probably undergo more surgery to reassess her condition, Gamble told reporters during the news conference. "Typically most wounded individuals will undergo another surgery or two every 24 - 48 hours. This is what we call washout procedure, where we re-examine their wounds, if any tissue needs to be cleaned we will clean it, and reassess the vitality of the tissue, but this is pretty typical." Dozier, along with cameraman Paul Douglas, 48, and soundman James Brolan,42, were travelling in a US military convoy working on a story about American troops in Iraq on Memorial Day, when a car bomb exploded. Douglas and Brolan, both British citizens, were killed in the blast. Before her flight, Dozier, a 39-year-old US citizen, underwent two surgeries at a military hospital in Baghdad for injuries from the bombing, CBS said. By early Tuesday, doctors had removed shrapnel from Dozier's head but said she had more serious injuries to her lower body, CBS News reported on its Web site. The US military said an American soldier and an Iraqi interpreter were killed in the same blast and six American soldiers were injured. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/477d634d553883097c7ac508b7a41471 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
    

Channel Title : AP Archive

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Published Date : 2015-07-30T10:37:53.000Z

(2 Sep 2011) SHOTLIST 1. Wide exterior of Landstuhl Regional Medical Centre 2. Blue bus arriving carrying injured US soldiers from Afghanistan and Iraq to hospital 3. Patient being unloaded on stretcher from van 4. Mid of army doctors and officials waiting to receive patients 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Commander Manuel Mak, US Navy Chaplain: "It''s the difference in terms of spiritual care, where, when they come over here we want to make sure that this is not ''Heartbreak Hotel''. Everyone has their own story in terms of coming over here with their injury and we know that when they have a physical injury, they also have an emotional injury." 6. Patient being wheeled into hospital 7. Various of scans being viewed on screen 8. SOUNDBITE: (English) Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Tim Richter, Radiology chief: "In the past the patients would arrive with either hard copies of their films or CDs, CD Roms. And for example, say we have 13 patients arrive here we would have to strategise which one we get loaded first, which ones we look at first. Having the data here already ahead of time, we can look very quickly and see which ones are more acute and which ones are going to require more care." 9. Various of patient in CT scan 10. Various of soldier giving blood 11. Wide of people giving blood 12. Close of vials containing blood 13. Wide interior of hospital 14. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lieutenant Colonel John Oh, Trauma Director: "I think the biggest difference between a military facility and a civilian facility, especially earlier on in the war was that they got blood parts much quicker than they would at a civilian facility, so I think a lot of the civilian trauma centres are actually trying to start adopting that practice as well and are possibly seeing differences in their outcomes as a result of doing that." 15. Wide interior of hospital 16. Tilt-down to patients receiving physiotherapy 17. Patient being wheeled on hospital bed 18. Wide interior of hospital STORYLINE Volunteer staff from the US military''s Landstuhl Regional Medical centre huddle outside the emergency room doors, in what has become a daily routine in a decade of war, awaiting the arrival of the latest casualties from Iraq and Afghanistan. Some are in surgical scrubs, others in uniform, more in white hospital gowns. They crowd around of the back of the modified school bus as the door opens, forming two lines of four on either side, as they pass the heavy stretcher out loaded with both the patient and a portable life support system and lower it to a wheeled gurney. Amongst those waiting to receive patients is an army chaplain. "Everyone has their own story in terms of coming over here with their injury and we know that when they have a physical injury, they also have an emotional injury," said Navy chaplain Commander Manuel Mak after talking with the incoming wounded. Since the start of the conflicts that have seen more than 6,000 Americans killed, Landstuhl has treated more-than 13,000 combat injuries and some 64,000 noncombat injuries from Afghanistan and Iraq. The hospital has also treated soldiers from 49 coalition nations and others injured in the combat zones, including several journalists. Injured troops are flown in on aircraft that are essentially airborne intensive care units, something not available during the 1991 Gulf War or for the US troops in Somalia after that. When they arrive, doctors have already "seen" inside their bodies, looking at CAT-scan images taken in the combat zone, sent electronically to the hospital, and turned into 3-D images by computers so that doctors can locate injuries and foreign bodies, technology only available for the last five years. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/0843a24508a5d43eb957609914d9d88b Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
    

Channel Title : AP Archive

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Published Date : 2015-07-30T10:44:04.000Z

(27 Jul 2011) AP Television U.S. military aircraft - April 29, 2011 1. Wide of plane interior 2. Mid of Specialist Adam Castagna 3. Close of Specialist Adam Castagna's face 4. Mid of Adam Castagna whispering to his brother Michael 5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Michael Castagna, brother of wounded soldier "When we first saw him, things didn't look great. He was on life support, he had internal bleeding, and I'll be honest with you, we weren't sure if he was going to make it." 6. Mid of CCATT team treating Adam Castagna 7. SOUNDBITE: (English) Col. Charles Chappuis, flight physician "Basically we're taking or using a multi-purpose aircraft, a military aircraft, that can maybe one day be carrying cargo and the next day carrying a full load of injured patients. We're, from the CCATT standpoint, converting it, or at least a small part of that aircraft, into a flying intensive care unit, with all of the equipment, the bells and whistles that you would expect to find in a civilian facility back in the United States." AP Television Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan 28 April 2011 8. Wide of jet flying overhead 9. Close of hospital sign reading: (English) "Joint Theater Hospital" 10. Mid of stretcher being wheeled to emergency room 11. Close of computer screen showing trauma results 11. SOUNDBITE: (English) Lt. Col. Kathleen Flarity "They've done everything exactly right here, they just need to get home, closer to their family, closer to their loved ones, to do their rehab." 12. Wide of medical bus backing up airplane ramp 13. Mid of medical crew carrying stretcher up ramp 14. Mid of medical crew talking to patient on board 15. Mid over the shoulder of cockpit controls 16. Mid over the shoulder of pilots flying aircraft AP Television Landstuhl, Germany - 24 April 2011 17. Wide of hospital 18. Mid of sign reading: (English) "Landstuhl Regional Medical Center" 19. SOUNDBITE: (English) Dr. Raymond Fang, Landstuhl trauma director "For all the trauma patients that arrive to Landstuhl, you have a better than 99 per cent chance of survival if you can make it to us. And I think that's really unprecedented. So if you are young and you get early care and you can go through the paradigm of staged care and get rapidly evacuated to here it seems to be effective. If you can get to here we'll get you home." AP Television Ramstein Air Base, Germany - 23 April 2011 20. Mid of Lt. Col. Michael Nave opening velcro straps on equipment 21. Various of medical equipment AP Television U.S. Military aircraft - 29 April 2011 23. Wide of medical bay inside plane 24. Mid of wounded service member 24. Mid of medical equipment 25. SOUNDBITE: (English) Col. Charles Chappuis, flight physician "Two of them are IED blast victims, the other is a medical problem that requires some specialised treatment back in the U.S. Nothing terribly unusual, they're very stable, which is good, and we'll deliver them as such, at least that's our intention." 26. Close of Adam Castagna as medical crew perform checks 27. Mid of medical crew tending Adam Castagna 28. Close of Michael Castagna rubbing Adam Castagna's head and leaning down to listen 29. SOUNDBITE: (English) Michael Castagna, brother of wounded soldier "He said to me he didn't think he'd survive the trip if I wasn't here. I said, I know you would, I'm just making it easier." 30. Mid of medical crew tending Adam Castagna 31. SOUNDBITE: (English) Michael Castagna, brother of wounded soldier (reporter in shot) "He's surrounded by super soldiers that are professional, they know their job and that basically, he's their mission. There's hardly any words to describe it, is what he said." AP Television Joint Base Andrews, Maryland, US. - 29 April 2011 32. Wide of ramp lowering from plane LEADIN You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/9e5978f4677a646e5347a117e568d780 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork

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